National Education Policy 2020

The National Education Policy 2020, which was approved by the Union Cabinet of India on 29 July 2020, outlines the vision of India’s new education system. The new policy replaces the previous National Policy on Education, 1986

What purpose does an NEP serve?

An NEP is a comprehensive framework to guide the development of education in the country. The need for a policy was first felt in 1964 when Congress MP Siddheshwar Prasad criticised the then government for lacking a vision and philosophy for education. The same year, a 17-member Education Commission, headed by then UGC Chairperson D S Kothari, was constituted to draft a national and coordinated policy on education. Based on the suggestions of this Commission, Parliament passed the first education policy in 1968.

What are the key takeaways?

The NEP proposes sweeping changes including opening up of Indian higher education to foreign universities, dismantling of the UGC and the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), introduction of a four-year multidisciplinary undergraduate programme with multiple exit options, and discontinuation of the M Phil programme.

In school education, the policy focuses on overhauling the curriculum, “easier” Board exams, a reduction in the syllabus to retain “core essentials” and thrust on “experiential learning and critical thinking”.

In a significant shift from the 1986 policy, which pushed for a 10+2 structure of school education, the new NEP pitches for a “5+3+3+4” design corresponding to the age groups 3-8 years (foundational stage), 8-11 (preparatory), 11-14 (middle), and 14-18 (secondary). This brings early childhood education (also known as pre-school education for children of ages 3 to 5) under the ambit of formal schooling. The mid-day meal programme will be extended to pre-school children. The NEP says students until Class 5 should be taught in their mother tongue or regional language.

The policy also proposes phasing out of all institutions offering single streams and that all universities and colleges must aim to become multidisciplinary by 2040.

Source: Indian Express (indianexpress.com)

States Close Schools, Promote Students Without Exams Amid COVID Surge

Due to a spike in COVID-19 cases, many States and Union Territories (UTs) have decided to close schools again. Some have also announced the promotion of students without exams, excluding those who will appear in their Class 10 and Class 12 board exams 2021.

New Delhi:

Amid a surge in the number of COVID-19 cases, several States and Union Territories (UTs) have decided to shut schools again. Some have also announced the promotion of students without exams, excluding those who will appear in their Class 10 and Class 12 board exams this year.

In March last year, all states had cancelled physical classes and shut educational institutions, following the nationwide COVID-19 lockdown announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Towards the end of 2020 and in January and February, 2021, most of them had resumed physical classes at least for some levels.

However, due to a spike in the daily COVID-19 caseload, some states have again stopped physical classes.

Karnataka

The Karnataka government had previously said it is planning to start the next academic year for schools from July 15, and it will be subject to the COVID-19 situation. “We are planning to start the next academic year for schools from July 15. We have to keep in mind the Covid situation as well,” Primary and Secondary Education Minister S Suresh Kumar said.

Source: NDTV (ndtv.com)